Wood-smoked blue eye with soured cream and wild mustard

Wood-smoked blue eye with soured cream and wild mustard

By
From
Igni
Serves
6–8, with left-over smoked fish
Photographer
Julian Kingma

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 x 600g firm medium-sized blue eye cod
5 litres fresh seawater
2 king edward potatoes, cut into 2 cm cubes
25g dried kelp
15 wild mustard flowers, washed and dried

soured cream

Quantity Ingredient
250ml jersey cream
1/2 teaspoon souring culture, (Flora – Type A)

Method

  1. For the soured cream, warm the cream in a heavy-based saucepan until it reaches 36ºC (97ºF) or blood temperature (you can easily recognise this by sticking your finger in the cream—if it’s the right temperature you won’t feel a temperature difference). Remove from the heat and pour into a bowl, stir through the souring culture, cover with plastic wrap and leave to sit in a warm place overnight.

    The next day, submerge the blue eye in a bucket filled with the seawater and leave to sit at room temperature for 1 hour. Remove from the water, dry thoroughly and set aside on a large tray.

    Place a log of olive wood over a low flame and leave it to catch and start a small fire. Place the tray of cod near the fire but not so close that it will cook the fish too quickly; you want the protein to set slowly and take on as much smoke flavour as possible (alternatively, and better still, try hanging the blue eye a decent distance away from the flame). Leave the fish to smoke until the flesh feels like soft tofu and has started to turn from opaque to white. Remove from the heat, cover and leave to sit for 1 hour.

    Wash the potato pieces in a bowl of cold water until soapy bubbles appear on the surface (that’s the starch coming out). Transfer the potatoes and water to a large saucepan, bring to a simmer and cook for 6 minutes, until the potato pieces are tender but still retain a slight bite. Cover and transfer to the fridge to cool.

    Put the kelp in a spice grinder and blitz to a fine powder.

    Plate, including the mustard flowers, as you wish (there is no right way, and we often change it depending on the day and how everything falls on the plate). Use your intuition.
Tags:
igni
aaron turner
loam
melbourne
australian cooking
woodfire grill
geelong
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