Pasta pieces with radicchio and speck

Pasta pieces with radicchio and speck

Maltagliati con radicchio e speck

By
From
Pasta
Serves
4
Photographer
Laura Edwards

The idea for this dish, which I have adapted, originates in the Treviso province of Veneto, where the famous spadone, a variety of radicchio, grows. The plant undergoes various processes before being sold. For instance, after the whole plant has been plucked from the ground and the leaves bound together, the roots are placed in running fresh water, which takes away a certain bitterness. It is called radicchio tardivo di Treviso because it is available during the winter season. There are numerous ways of using radicchio: as a vegetable, in salads, and in risotto. It can even be used to make grappa!

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
300g Fresh egg pasta
salt and pepper, to taste
50g aged asiago cheese or parmesan, freshly grated

Sauce

Quantity Ingredient
6 tablespoons olive oil
1 onion, peeled and finely chopped
200g speck, or any smoked bacon or ham, cut into small chunks
400g winter radicchio, leaves cut into small 6–8cm chunks, the roots into small cubes
100ml prosecco

Pasta method

Quantity Ingredient
Shaping short pasta

Method

  1. First of all, roll out the pasta dough, by hand or machine, to 2mm in thickness. Cut into a maltagliati shape. Cover with a tea towel until ready to cook.
  2. Heat the oil in a large pan, add the onion and Speck, and fry for a couple of minutes. Add the radicchio and wine plus about 50ml water. Fry until the radicchio is soft, about 10–15 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in plenty of boiling salted water for about 4–5 minutes or until al dente. Drain the pasta, and mix with the sauce in the pan. Serve sprinkled with the grated cheese and salt and pepper.

Alternatives

  • You could use any fresh pasta, particularly long pasta such as tagliatelle. Instead of fresh pasta, you could use 250g dried lasagne or pappardelle, broken into irregular pieces: these would need cooking for about 8 minutes. Red instead of white wine would add a different, deeper flavour, and of course you could scatter the finished dish with some greenery, such as parsley.
Tags:
Antonio
Carluccio
pasta
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