Sautéed chicken livers with marsala and orange

Sautéed chicken livers with marsala and orange

By
From
Citrus
Serves
2
Photographer
Mowie Kay

Chicken livers are a regular fast lunch for my husband and me on the days we both work from home, and I throw in whatever I have to hand. On this particular day I used Marsala in place of the more usual vermouth – and my husband said it was the best plate of liver he’d ever eaten so we’ve stuck with it.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 teaspoon olive oil
15g butter
1 large onion, sliced
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
1 red chilli, finely chopped
400g chicken livers, trimmed
50ml sweet marsala
1 large orange, segmented, peel and membranes reserved, see recipe note
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper

To serve

Quantity Ingredient
sourdough toast, buttered
a handful parsley, finely chopped, (optional)

Method

  1. Heat the olive oil and butter in a large frying pan until the butter has melted. Add the onion, garlic and chilli and sauté on a medium heat for several minutes until softening and turning a very light golden brown. Push the onion and garlic to one side and add the liver. Cook for 2–3 minutes on each side. Season with salt and pepper.
  2. Turn up the heat and add the Marsala. Allow to boil down for around 30 seconds, then add the orange segments. Take the reserved orange peel and membranes and squeeze any excess juice over the livers. Serve with some buttered sourdough toast and a sprinkling of parsley, if you like.

How to cut

  • Top and tail the citrus and sit it firmly on your chopping board. Then cut from top to bottom, following the contour of the fruit, making sure you are cutting away the pith and outer membrane as you go. When you have cut all the way around, trim o any other bits of white pith you can see. You can then slice or dice the fruit as it is, flicking out pips as you go. For membrane-less segments, take the fruit in one hand and cut along one side of each segment – you can then either cut down the other side to release the segment or you can carefully scrape the flesh in one movement from the centre to the edge – this will ensure you remove every bit of flesh from that side. You should always do this over a bowl to catch any juice, and I always squeeze out the discarded peel and membranes too.
Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again