Pandoro di verona

Pandoro di verona

Italy

By
From
80 Cakes Around the World
Makes
18cm cake
Photographer
Jean Cazals

Pandoro means golden bread, and was originally intended for the Venetian aristocracy, who could afford such luxuries as butter, eggs and honey. Gradually over the years, sugar replaced honey, other changes were made and the recipe developed the soft, cakey texture we know today. In 1894 a man named Domenico Melegatti applied for a patent for a procedure that revolutionised the production of pandoro. I have no idea what the procedure was but I do know that the cake can take master pandoro bakers a full 24 hours to make. Although the version below is not strictly authentic, it makes a lovely cake and takes about 9 hours from start to finish - most of this is rising time rather than hands-on work. You can speed up the proving process by making the kitchen as warm as possible. If you don't have a pandoro tin, use an 18cm round, deep tin instead.

The icing sugar is supposed to resemble the snowy peaks of the Italian Alps at Christmas, when the cake is normally served.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
275g plain flour
3 egg yolks
90g caster sugar
25g unsalted butter, melted
60ml water
1 medium egg
1/2 lemon, grated zest
icing sugar, for dusting

Yeast mixture

Quantity Ingredient
30g plain flour
7g easy-blend dried yeast
7g caster sugar
30ml warm water

Method

  1. Put all the ingredients for the yeast mixture in a small bowl and mix well. Cover with a damp tea towel and leave to rise in a warm place for 2 hours or until doubled in size.
  2. Place 165g of the flour in a freestanding electric mixer fitted with a dough hook. In a separate bowl, beat together 2 egg yolks, 60g caster sugar, the butter and water. Add the yeast mixture and mix well. Pour this mixture into the flour and mix on a low speed to form a sticky dough. Continue to work the dough for 5-10 minutes, until smooth. It should remain somewhat tacky, unlike bread dough. Oil or butter a large bowl and put the dough in it, turning to coat all sides. Cover with cling film and leave to rise in a warm place for 2 hours.
  3. Punch down the dough and add the remaining flour, egg yolk and sugar, plus the egg and lemon zest. Knead until blended, then knead by hand on a floured work surface for 10 minutes, until smooth and shiny; if this seems like too much work, you can knock the dough back in the food mixer on a low speed. Place in an oiled or buttered bowl, cover with cling film, then leave to rise for another 2 hours.
  4. Butter and flour a pandoro tin. Punch the dough down and roll it into a ball. Place it in the tin, cover and leave to rise for 1 1/2 hours or until doubled in size.
  5. Heat the oven to 190°C. Bake the cake for 35 minutes, until a skewer inserted in the centre comes out clean. Leave in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn out on to a wire rack to cool completely. Dust liberally with icing sugar.
Tags:
Baking
cake
cakes
Claire Clark
80 Cakes Around the World
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