Pulled pork feijoada

Pulled pork feijoada

By
From
Cabana The Cookbook
Serves
4
Photographer
Martin Poole

This is our new-style feijoada recipe, which combines black beans simmered with rich chorizo sausage and pulled pork. Our recipe is a quick and easy version of the traditional, rather complicated Brasilian stew – so you’ll have more time to spend making caipirinhas!

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
3 cooking chorizo sausages, sliced
1 onion, chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 carrot, chopped
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 tablespoon tomato puree
1 x 400g tinned black turtle beans, drained
1 tablespoon vegetable or chicken bouillon powder
few sprigs thyme
225g Pulled pork sliders, pork only
1 tablespoon Spicy malagueta marinade
small handful flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper

Method

  1. Heat the oil in a large pan and add the chorizo. Fry for 2 minutes on each side, until golden brown. Add the onion, celery, carrot and garlic and cook, stirring frequently, over a medium heat for 6–8 minutes, until softened. Stir in the tomato purée and season with salt and pepper. Fry for another 2 minutes, until the vegetables begin to colour.
  2. Add the black beans and stir well. Add the stock powder and thyme leaves and stir again. If you find it a little too thick, add a splash of water – just enough to cover the ingredients. Part-cover the pan and simmer gently for 10–15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until everything is soft.
  3. Add the pulled pork and spicy malagueta marinade to the pan. Stir well, then taste and adjust the seasoning. Once the pork has heated through, stir in the chopped parsley and ladle into warmed bowls. Serve with biro-biro rice, toasted farofa, orange wedges and potato matchsticks for the proper feijoada experience.

Feijoada: The Saturday meal

  • Although Sunday dinner is the big meal of the week in many parts of Europe, in Brasil it’s all about Saturday lunch, when friends and family gather together to cook, eat, gossip and drink copious caipirinhas. It’s integral to family life, a time to get together and catch up.

    Central to the Saturday meal is Brasil’s most iconic dish: feijoada. It’s generally thought that it was invented by African slaves working on the plantations, who would save up the unwanted cuts of meat and cook them low and slow with beans, which were cheap and readily available. These days, though, there are many regional variations: pumpkin might be added in Bahia, white beans in the North East, or black turtle beans in Rio. In a traditional feijoada completa, the whole pig is used. You’ll find dried beef, pork, cured meat and bacon along with pig’s tongue, ear, foot and tail. If you go to a restaurant serving feijoada completa or visit a Brasilian friend on a Saturday, you’ll find bowls of various stewed meats on the table alongside bowls of rice, farofa, collard greens and sliced oranges, so you can assemble a dish that’s exactly to your liking. We’ve taken the essence of feijoada and used some of our favourite cuts of meat to make a classic, comforting dish that’s easy to replicate at home.
Tags:
Cabana
Brasilian
Brazilian
Brasil
Brazil
Latin
South
American
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