Tripe meatballs

Tripe meatballs

Polpette di trippa

By
From
Florentine
Makes
20 meatballs
Photographer
Lauren Bamford

Funnily enough, Artusi himself was not fond of tripe, saying, ‘Tripe, however it is cooked and flavoured, is always ordinary.’ Nevertheless, he suggests this recipe for deep-fried tripe meatballs to convert the indifferent or the squeamish – it’s adapted from a cookbook dating to 1694. These meatballs make a delicious antipasto and are an easy way to get into using this cheap, nutritious, healthy ingredient.

In Florence, you can purchase already cooked tripe from the trippaio or lampredottaio (tripe or lampredotto vendors selling from food vans strategically dotted around the city), which saves time. If you buy it from your butcher, you will probably need to cook it (ask, just to be sure). To prepare tripe for this dish, simply place it in a stockpot of water with a whole, peeled onion and boil for 1 hour or until tender. You may need to add more water to keep the tripe sufficiently covered. When cooked, drain the tripe, rinse gently under running water and allow to cool before using in this recipe.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
400g boiled honeycomb tripe, about 500 g if uncooked
80g prosciutto, (or pancetta or ham)
2 eggs
45g grated pecorino or parmesan cheese
265g dry breadcrumbs
pinch freshly ground nutmeg
1 handful flat-leaf parsley, chopped
100g plain flour
olive oil, for frying

Method

  1. Finely mince the boiled tripe and prosciutto in a food processor. Add 1 egg, the cheese, 2 tablespoons of the breadcrumbs, the nutmeg, parsley and some salt and pepper. Continue blending until you have a well-combined, paste-like mixture.
  2. Put three small bowls on the benchtop. Add the flour to one, beat the remaining egg in the other and add the remaining breadcrumbs to the third. Roll the tripe mixture into small balls about the size of a walnut, then dip each ball first into the flour, rolling to coat evenly, then in the beaten egg and finally into the breadcrumbs. Set aside until you have used up the mixture.
  3. Heat enough olive oil in a small saucepan so that the balls will float. Heat the oil to about 180°C. If you don’t have a sugar thermometer or similar to measure the temperature, throw a small cube of bread into the oil. At the right temperature, you should start to see little bubbles along the bottom of the pan. When the bread hits the oil it should immediately be surrounded by tiny little bubbles and turn nicely golden in about 15 seconds. At this point, turn the heat down a fraction and fry the balls until evenly deep golden brown and crisp. This should take about 1½ minutes. Carefully remove the tripe balls from the oil with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Season with salt.
  4. Serve hot as part of an antipasto, accompanied perhaps with some marinated olives or thinly sliced prosciutto.
Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again