Introduction

Introduction

By
Emilie Guelpa
Contains
0 recipes
Published by
Hardie Grant Books
ISBN
9781742707808
Photographer
Emilie Guelpa

The beginning

In 2012, while I was arranging a set of colour-coded origami papers, something clicked: the desire to make a series of colourful tarts which would form a beautiful array of colour: a culinary palette. As a graphic designer, I use swatches every day for reference and to be inspired by the colours and shades. It was obvious that the swatch was the ideal form for my project!

I created a small series of tarts for the magazine Fricote and a book was the next natural step. 50 new colours, 50 shades, 50 recipes! A beautiful combination of colour, design and delicious food.

After many months of drawing, note-taking, painting and photographing; testing flavours and recipes with fruits, vegetables, and any other colourful ingredients I could find; arranging and rearranging colours and shades, here are my 50 recipes inspired by colours.

Bon appétit!

Emilie Guelpa

Some tips before you start

There are so many different foods that can be used to create colour-inspired tarts. Feel free to make your own creations using fruits, vegetables, candy – or anything else you can think of. You can also use food dyes to achieve the different colours with more or less intensity. The important thing is to combine a white base at the bottom with a (more-or-less uniform) colour at the top.

To get the best results when whipping cream, it is important that the cream is very cold, and it’s also a good idea to place the bowl and beaters in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before use. Ensuring that everything is chilled helps to create the lightest, fluffiest whipped cream, that holds its shape for longer. It’s preferable to use an electric mixer, as this makes it much easier to beat the cream until it is nice and firm.

The recipes in this book are given for two tarts of approximately 11 cm × 14 cm. If you don’t have a baking tin that is the correct size, you can use a larger tin and make an aluminium foil lining to adjust the size. When cutting pastry to size, you might like to cut a piece of cardboard to use as a template (cut pastry a little larger than the desired size, as it will shrink while cooking).

All of the flour used in the recipes is plain flour, unless otherwise specified.

Pistachio paste is available from gourmet food stores. To make your own, blend a handful of skinned, unsalted pistachios with a pinch of sugar in a food processor. Add a few drops of olive oil and blend until the mixture is very smooth.

Brick pastry is a very thin Tunisian pastry, also known as ‘brik’. If unavailable, you can substitute filo pastry, but use 4 sheets instead of 2. Cut the pastry into rectangles, brush with melted butter and layer the pastry so that you have 2 stacks of 4 rectangles. Bake for 3–4 minutes at 160°C or until crisp and golden.

1 tablespoon is equivalent to 4 teaspoons.

Finally, the most important thing is to have fun! The kitchen should be a place of sharing, experimentation and relaxation. Don’t hold back: be creative and express yourself!

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