My favourite chocolate mousse

My favourite chocolate mousse

By
From
Paris Pastry Club
Serves
4
Photographer
Helen Cathcart

This chocolate mousse is incredibly light. It sort of melts on your tongue the way candyfloss does. And clouds too. It might sound a bit tricky with three different components, but really can be assembled in a matter of minutes.

Once the mousse is made, it will still look a little runny, but don’t worry, it will set as it cools down into a pillow of chocolate.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
75g dark chocolate
25g milk chocolate
150g whipping cream
25g caster sugar
25g water
2 egg yolks

Method

  1. Melt both chocolates in a large heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. In the meantime, whip the cream to soft peaks and set aside in the fridge.
  2. Once the chocolate is melted, keep it warm over the pan of hot water off the heat while you make a sabayon. Bring the sugar and water to the boil in a small pan. Quickly whisk the egg yolks together in a bowl using either an electric beater or a stand-mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Pour the piping-hot syrup over them a little at a time, whisking constantly. Once all the syrup is incorporated, whisk for 3–4 minutes, or until thick and holding soft peaks.
  3. Now that all the elements are ready, use a balloon whisk to mix half the whipped cream into the melted chocolate until smooth and shiny. Still using the whisk, fold in the remaining cream. When the white streaks just start to disappear, add the sabayon and incorporate gently, starting from the centre of the bowl and going up the side, turning the bowl clockwise as you do so.
  4. At this point, the mousse should look almost even in colour. Switch to a spatula and give it a few more stirs. Divide between 4 small bowls or martini glasses and chill in the fridge for at least 4 hours.

Perfect whipped cream

  • 1. Ten minutes before you start, place a bowl and the whisk in the freezer to chill. Cream definitely whips faster and in a more stable way if everything around it is super-cold.

    2. If you’re whipping cream for a mousse, whip it until it just starts to get to the soft peak stage. It might look under-whipped to you but, trust me, the just-whipped texture makes for the softest fluffiest mousse. In fact, cream has the most air in when it forms soft peaks. Under-whipping it ever so slightly ensures that when you incorporate it, the cream won’t become overworked and lose too much air.

    3. You can most definitely whip cream ahead of time – up to an hour before you plan to use it. Simply give it another one-minute whisking before you do so.

    4. Chantilly is cream whipped with sugar and a little vanilla to stiff peaks. I usually use 10 g icing sugar per 100 g cream.
Tags:
Paris Pastry Club
Fanny
Zanotti
French
Paris
Parisian
baking
baker
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