Taramasalata

Taramasalata

By
From
Moorish
Makes
500 g
Photographer
Mark Roper

It might seem strange to include a recipe for taramasalata, given that it is available just about everywhere these days. But sadly, the plastic tubs of lurid pink gloop sold as taramasalata bear scant resemble to the original version. In its true form, it is a creamy smooth, pinky golden purée, tangy with garlic and lemon juice, and bursting with flavours of the sea. And it couldn’t be easier to make, requiring nothing more than a little blitzing in a food processor. When you’ve tasted the light, fluffy and far subtler homemade version, you’ll never buy it ready-made again!

Tarama itself is the salted preserved roe of grey mullet (commercial versions are often made from the less expensive cod’s roe) and comes as a very firm, hot-pink paste. Avoid any that seems to have an orange tinge, as it is likely to be bitter. I used to rinse the tarama to remove some of the excess salt, but it is rather fragile, and I’ve come to the conclusion that rinsing is not really necessary.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
100g tarama
2 thick-cut slices good quality white bread
garlic, roughly chopped
1-1 1/2 lemons, juiced
250ml olive oil
250ml vegetable oil
100ml water

Method

  1. Slice away the crusts from the bread and chop the bread roughly. Put it into a mixing bowl and pour on enough water to cover. Then fish out the bread and squeeze it tightly. Put the scrunched-up bread into the food processor with the tarama, garlic and the juice of one of the lemons and whiz everything to a paste.
  2. Mix the two oils together and start to drizzle them into the processor. Begin with about 100 ml of oil, then loosen the mixture up with about 2 tablespoons water. Continue adding first the oil, then the water in similar quantities, and finish with the remaining lemon juice. The purée should be light and fluffy and the prettiest pale pink golden colour.
  3. Taste the taramasalata and adjust the balance if necessary. Tip it into a container, cover and refrigerate where it will keep for 4–5 days.
Tags:
Malouf
Greg
Lucy
Moorish
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