Glazed apple-raisin fritters

Glazed apple-raisin fritters

By
From
New Feast
Makes
20
Photographer
Alan Benson

These are a knockout, and a firm favourite for a lazy weekend brunch … or for afternoon tea … or a late night snack. And they make an impressive last-minute dessert, too, if you dress them up with ice cream or creme fraiche.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
140g plain flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
30g caster sugar
pinch ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 large egg
140ml milk
3 large apples
2 tablespoons golden raisins, very roughly chopped
sunflower or vegetable oil, for deep-frying

Apple glaze

Quantity Ingredient
140g icing sugar
40ml apple cider, or apple juice

Method

  1. Sift the flour and baking powder into a mixing bowl. Add the sugar, cinnamon and salt and whisk together briefly.
  2. In a different bowl, whisk the egg with the milk. Tip into the dry ingredients and whisk everything together well to make a smooth batter. Set aside while you prepare the apples.
  3. Peel the apples. Cut them into halves and remove the core (this is easiest with a melon baller). Cut into 5 mm thick slices, then cut the slices into 5 mm matchsticks.
  4. When ready to cook, pour vegetable oil into a heavy-based saucepan or a deep-fryer to a depth of 5 cm and heat to 170°C.
  5. Add the apple matchsticks and raisins to the batter and mix well. Drop small spoonfulls of batter into the oil ensuring you include a few raisins and 4–5 pieces of apple. You could also use a fork to do this. Don’t worry about the shape – the more free-form, the better! Add more fritters to the pan, but do not overcrowd it. Fry for around 5 minutes, turning the fritters around in the oil from time to time, until they are evenly golden brown and crisp. Use a slotted spoon to lift them onto a plate lined with kitchen paper to drain.
  6. Whisk the sugar and cider together to make a fairly thick glaze. Drizzle onto the fritters while they are still hot. Serve straight away.

Note:

  • The key thing when cooking these fritters is not to heat the oil to too high a temperature, so it’s best to use a candy thermometer. If you don’t have one, the oil will have reached the correct temperature when a cube of bread browns lightly in about 30 seconds. Any faster and it will be too hot.
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