Food notes

Food notes

By
Greg Malouf, Lucy Malouf
Contains
0 recipes
Published by
Hardie Grant Books
ISBN
9781742708423
Photographer
Alan Benson

Measuring

When it comes to measuring, we use the metric scale. In the main, we weigh things or we measure them by volume. This is because it’s the most accurate approach and it’s the way professional chefs do it. It’s also the most straightforward, given that different countries have different sizes for their ‘cups’ and tablespoons, which can over-complicate matters when you measure ingredients in this way. (Australian tablespoons are 20 ml, but American and British tablespoons are 15 ml; American cups are 225 ml, but Australian and British ones are 250 ml).

The only exception we make is for fresh herbs. Because bunches come in varying sizes and because some amounts are just too light to weigh on most domestic kitchen scales we use measuring cups or tablespoons (American, Australian or British – with herbs, it really doesn’t matter).

Our main advice is not to get too hung up about measuring. In the main, a bit extra or less here and there is not going to affect a dish. It’s only really important to be accurate with baking and with pastries and desserts.

Oven temperatures

Our ovens are fan-assisted, as most seem to be these days, and they heat to a slightly higher temperature than conventional ovens. Reduce the temperature by about 10°C if your oven is the conventional kind. Remember, too, that ovens tend to have their own idiosyncrasies and nothing should replace your own understanding of the hot and cool spots within.

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