Single cup filter

Single cup filter

By
From
Rustic

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
freshly roasted, well-sourced beans
a grinder
a filter cone and filter paper
a kettle
a cup

Method

  1. Start with some freshly roasted coffee – by which I mean beans that have been allowed to rest one week from date of roast and preferably no more than three weeks. I have, however, been known to drink coffee well into its sixth week and still enjoy it. There are many kinds of filter cones available on the market; my favourite is a black plastic one by Melitta, for the reason that they don’t chip in the sink. For the filter paper we use Filtra in size 2k. There are many grinders available, including some quite good hand-grinders which do the job. You will also need a kettle and the right cup. Each to their own when it comes to cups, but we prefer to use cups, or mugs, that hold up to 200 ml of water.
  2. As a rule we use 25 g of roasted coffee beans per 200 ml of water. Grind the coffee beans while the kettle boils. You’ll need to experiment to get the grind right for you, but, as a guide, you want it to look and feel like powder while coarse enough to still feel slightly gritty.
  3. Place the filter cone on top of the cup with the filter paper on top. Flush a little hot water from the kettle through the filter paper. Pour away the water in the cup and replace the filter cone. This process will not only remove any potential flavour taints from the paper but also heat your cup. Next put your ground coffee into the cone and, using water that is just off the boil (leave the kettle for a couple of minutes), pour a little over the top of the coffee to pre-infuse it. You should see a kind of mini volcanic reaction from the coffee, bubbling with a creamy froth, which is an indicator of freshly roasted and ground coffee. If it is not freshly ground or freshly roasted the effect is far less dramatic and flat. The key here is not to allow the grounds to compact, so keep adding water at a steady rate until you remove the cone to expose a cup of wonderful coffee. Simple.
  4. This process should take no longer than three minutes from start to finish. The wonderful thing about making coffee this way is it allows you to taste and compare coffees from any farm, estate or country of origin and really get an appreciation for the subtle characteristics and nuances of the individual beans. By allowing water to flow through without the use of any pressure other than that of gravity we believe the true character of the coffee is drawn into the cup.
Tags:
English
Spanish
French
casual
entertaining
London
cafe
breakfast
lunch
dinner
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again