Rolls, flat breads and breadsticks

Rolls, flat breads and breadsticks

By
Leiths School of Food and Wine
Contains
12 recipes
Published by
Quadrille Publishing
ISBN
978 184949 548 6
Photographer
Peter Cassidy

This chapter showcases delicious rolls and breads from around the world, as well as providing lots of ideas for shaping and flavouring more traditional doughs. There is nothing quite like a batch of freshly baked rolls to accompany a meal when you are entertaining. Try the fresh herb naan breads alongside a spiced soup or curry, or taralli pugliesi with an antipasti of Italian cured meats, salami and salads.

Many of the bread dough recipes featured earlier in this book as large loaves can also be made into bread rolls. Just weigh them to ensure all the rolls will be the same size and reduce the cooking time accordingly.

Shaping plain rolls

It is worth being a little more precise when shaping rolls, as the aim is to make each roll in a batch look uniform. We would advise you to weigh the dough and calculate the exact weight each roll should be to ensure they will all be the same size. Rolls can be spaced out on the baking sheet with room between them to ensure they don’t join together when proving or baking, or they can be spaced so that they will join at the edges; this is called batch baking.

Fresh cooled rolls can be successfully frozen in a sealed plastic bag and defrosted for use. Place the defrosted rolls in the oven, preheated to 190°C, for 3 minutes to crisp them up before serving.

Divide the knocked back dough into equal pieces and shape into balls. Take a ball and gently stretch and pull the dough towards the top, creating a smooth surface underneath.

Turn the roll over so the smooth side is uppermost, and neaten the roll with the sides of your hands. Shape the other rolls, working quickly to ensure the first ones do not over-prove.

Place the rolls on a lightly greased baking sheet, spacing them apart. Lightly pat down the tops to flatten a little.

Shaping a pawnbroker

Place 3 equal-sized small balls of dough together to form a trefoil-shaped roll.

Shaping a catherine wheel

Coil the sausage of dough to form a spiral.

Shaping a knot

Tie the sausage of dough into a knot and hide the ends underneath.

Shaping a pointed roll

Roll the opposite ends of the ball of dough to flatten and taper into points.

Featured Recipes in this Chapter

    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again