Rabbit boudin with broad beans, peas and vichyssoise sauce

Rabbit boudin with broad beans, peas and vichyssoise sauce

By
From
Taste of Australia
Serves
6-8
Prep
20 mins
Cooking time
20 mins
Photographer
Stuart Scott

This was made from local rabbit by chef Tony Worland from Tonic Restaurant in Millthorpe, New South Wales. It is a play on a French boudin blanc, which is usually made with chicken or pork.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient

Rabbit boudin

Quantity Ingredient
500g minced rabbit
4 egg yolks
1 tablespoon fresh tarragon, finely chopped
salt
freshly ground black pepper
400ml pouring cream
fresh sausage skins
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Vichyssoise sauce

Quantity Ingredient
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
20g butter
2 leeks, chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
3 all-purpose potatoes, such as desiree, peeled and diced
250ml chicken stock
sea salt
100ml pouring cream
2 teaspoons truffle oil
freshly ground black pepper

Greens

Quantity Ingredient
20g butter
95g broad beans, blanched
100g fresh peas
2 tarragon sprigs
1 bunch pea tendrils, washed
crisp pancetta, to serve
freshly shaved black truffle, to serve (optional)

Method

  1. Put the rabbit in a bowl over a larger bowl of ice and add the egg yolks one by one. Add the tarragon, season to taste, then gently fold in the cream. Place the mixture in a piping bag and pipe into the sausage skins. Tie the sausages with string to the desired lengths and place in a steamer. Steam slowly until the sausages become firm, around 15 minutes. Remove from the steamer and set aside to cool, then place in the refrigerator to set.
  2. For the sauce, melt the oil and butter in a pan over medium heat. Add the leek and garlic and sweat until soft. Add the potatoes, cover with the stock and add some sea salt. When the potatoes are cooked, blend and finish with the cream, truffle oil and salt and pepper.
  3. In a heavy-based frying pan, heat the olive oil and fry the boudin slowly for a few minutes, turning until warm and lightly golden. If the pan is too hot, the boudin will split. For the greens, in a separate frying pan, heat the butter then add the greens to warm. To serve, spread the vichyssoise on the base of a serving plate, top with the greens, boudin and the pancetta and truffle, if using.

Wine

  • Try a white wine with texture, like chardonnay or pinot gris, or a rosé.

Lyndey’s note

  • This mixture can make little or large burger patties, too.
Tags:
Lyndey
Milan
Taste of Australia
Australian
Oz
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