Snapper with mango salsa

Snapper with mango salsa

By
From
Taste of Australia
Serves
4
Prep
10 mins
Cooking time
10 mins
Photographer
Stuart Scott

One of the highlights of filming Taste of Australia was foraging and cooking with my long-time friend Rick Stein at his restaurant and hotel Bannisters at Mollymook on the New South Wales south coast. He cooked this on a barbecue overlooking the ocean, but of course it could easily be cooked in a frying pan.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
4 x 175g pieces snapper, skin on
extra-virgin olive oil, to brush and serve
salt, to taste
freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Mango salsa

Quantity Ingredient
100g cooked, peeled coila prawns or peeled, cooked yabbies
1 ripe but firm mango, peeled and cut into 1 cm dice
1 ripe but firm avocado, peeled and cut into 1 cm dice
4 spring onions, thinly sliced
2 large medium–hot red dutch chillies, seeded and thinly sliced
2 finger limes, seeds scraped out
1/2 lime, juiced
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 handful baby coriander leaves
salt, to taste
freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Method

  1. Preheat a barbecue to high.
  2. Brush both sides of the snapper fillets with the oil and season with salt and pepper. Cook the fillets on the barbecue, skin side down, for 3–5 minutes. Turn the snapper and cook for a further 3–5 minutes or until just cooked through.
  3. Cut the prawns or yabbies into small chunks and mix gently in a large bowl with the remaining salsa ingredients, reserving a few finger lime seeds for garnish. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  4. To serve, divide the salsa among four serving plates and top each with a piece of snapper. Drizzle with a little oil, sprinkle with some extra salt and garnish with a few finger lime pearls.

Wine

  • The fresh, light and limey flavours here cry out for the same in a riesling or semillon – and both can handle chilli.

Lyndey’s note

  • Coila prawns are so named because they come from Coila Lake near Tuross on the south coast of New South Wales. Dutch chillies are long, slender and pointed and not as fiery as some. You could use any other type of chilli, if you can’t find the Dutch variety.
Tags:
Lyndey
Milan
Taste of Australia
Australian
Oz
Aussie
tv
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