Scones

Scones

By
From
Baking
Makes
12
Photographer
Vanessa Levis

Hot scones with cream and a good berry jam make that delight known as Devonshire tea. The original West England version uses clotted cream, but whipped cream also works well. No afternoon tea is complete without a scone recipe and with so many variations possible, there is something to suit everyone.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
450g self-raising flour
1 teaspoon salt
60g butter, diced
1 1/4 cups milk or buttermilk
extra milk, for brushing

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 230°C. Lightly grease a baking tray.
  2. Sift the flour and salt into a bowl. Rub in the butter. Add nearly all the milk at once and mix in quickly with a knife. Add the remaining milk only if necessary to mix to a soft dough.
  3. Turn onto a floured board and knead lightly by turning and pressing with the heel of the hand three or four times.
  4. Pat the dough out to a round 2 cm thick and cut into 4 cm rounds with a floured cutter. Re-roll the dough scraps once and cut more rounds. Place the scones close together on the prepared baking tray. Brush the tops with a little milk and bake in the top of the oven for 10–15 minutes or until well risen and golden.
  5. For soft scones, wrap in a tea towel as soon as they come from the oven. For crusty scones, do not wrap; cool on a wire rack. Serve warm with butter or with jam and cream.

Note

  • Scone dough scraps can be gathered up, re-kneaded lightly and re-rolled once, but no more, otherwise the scones made from the scraps will be tough.

Variations

  • Fruit scones

    Follow the recipe for Scones, but stir in 1 tablespoon sugar and 1/2 cup sultanas or other dried fruit after rubbing in the butter. A little grated orange or lemon rind, or mixed spice, may also be added.

    Crusted orange scones

    Follow the recipe for Scones, but add 1 tablespoon sugar after rubbing in the butter, and use 1/4 cup orange juice and 3/4 cup milk for the liquid. Press a sugar cube dipped in orange juice on top of each scone before baking.

    Spiced fruit pinwheels

    Prepare the dough as for Scones. Roll out to a rectangle 5 mm thick, brush with melted butter and sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. Sprinkle with mixed dried fruit, roll up and cut into 2 cm thick slices. Place, cut sides up, in a greased, shallow baking tin and bake at 220°C for 10–12 minutes or until browned.

    Cheese scones

    Follow the recipe for Scones, but stir in 1/3 cup grated tasty cheese, 1/4 teaspoon dry mustard powder and a good grinding of black pepper or a pinch of cayenne pepper after rubbing in the butter. Bake at 220°C for about 10 minutes.

    Cheese-topped scone loaf

    Prepare the dough as for Cheese Scones (above), place on a lightly greased baking tray and shape into a round or rectangular loaf 2.5 cm thick. Mix together 45 g softened butter, a pinch of salt, 1/2 cup grated cheese and a pinch each of cayenne pepper, dry mustard powder and nutmeg. Spread mixture over the loaf. Sprinkle with a little paprika and bake for 12–18 minutes. Transfer to wire racks to cool. Serve cut in slices and buttered.

    Herb scones

    Follow the recipe for Scones, but add 1 tablespoon chopped mixed fresh herbs, or 1 teaspoon dried herbs with 1 tablespoon chopped parsley, 2 teaspoons finely chopped green onion and 1 teaspoon sugar after rubbing in the butter. Serve with morning coffee or as a savoury alternative at tea time.
Tags:
baking
bakery
margaret
fulton
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