Chives

Chives

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

A member of the onion family. Chives grow in clumps of slender green tubular leaves. With their delicate flavour and bright green colour, chives go particularly well with cheese, eggs and potatoes – especially baked potatoes, split open and piled with sour cream, topped with snipped chives.

Chives grow easily in the garden or in pots; they need plenty of sun and the more you cut them the more they grow. Chives are usually cut up small with scissors to prevent their bruising, and added to foods just before serving.

Ways to use fresh chives: Sprinkle over puréed soups (for example tomato, avocado, vichyssoise, potato); add to beaten eggs for an omelette; sprinkle over scrambled eggs; add to a cheese sandwich; snip over cooked potato or add to creamy mashed potatoes; sprinkle over glazed carrots, green salads, or raw or cooked tomatoes.

Garlic chives Garlic chives, Chinese chives, Chinese leek, ku chai or nira is a relatively new vegetable in the English-speaking world. The plant has a distinctive growth habit with strap-shaped leaves. Regular chives, on the other hand, have hollow round spears. The subtle garlic flavour of these chives is perfect for use in dishes where raw regular garlic would be overwhelming or too spicy. The flowers and stems of the budding or flowering chives are edible; simply discard the tough ends. Garlic chives are used regularly in Chinese stir-fries, vegetable dumplings and soups.

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