Cinnamon

Cinnamon

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

With its sweet, spicy smell, cinnamon gives an indefinable, delicious haunting quality to many foods. It is the bark of a tropical tree, trimmed from the thin branches and dried in the sun to form curled-up ‘quills’. The finest quality is pale yellowbuff in colour and looks like a roll of dried paper. It is also sold ground, in powder form.

Whole cinnamon, in sticks, is used when cooking corned beef or smoked pork, for the court bouillon for fish or in curry dishes and in many rice dishes like pilau or pilaf (see Rice). It is also used in pickling, in the cooking of many dried pea, bean and lentil dishes, and pears and apples poached with a piece of cinnamon are delicious.

Ground cinnamon is widely used in baking and in flavouring fruits and desserts, also rice custard, custard and eggnog. In Middle Eastern and South American cooking, ground cinnamon is used in meat, seafood and sauce cookery.

Ingredients

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see method for ingredients

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