Entrée

Entrée

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

Today, an entrée describes a made-up dish, served as a first course or as a light supper or lunch dish – it may even be the main dish of a meal.

The French word entrée means ‘way in’ or ‘entrance’. At a formal dinner, these dishes follow the soup and fish course and come before the main meat course. It is amusing to go through the menus of old-fashioned books – one cannot help but wonder how they did it. Today, much simpler menus are in favour and the separate hors d’oeuvre, soup, fish and entrée courses have practically combined into a first or starter course, and any one of these courses may be served.

Since entrées are usually ‘dressed’ or ‘made’ dishes, they are considered the first course to show the cook’s skill to the full. Attractive presentation is vital and, luckily, by their nature these small portions of meat, fish and so on, and their accompaniments, can be arranged in myriad different ways: in a pretty pastry case, en brochette, in individual ramekins or shells. They may also be individual feather-light soufflés, golden croquettes, fritters, filled crêpes or bouchées, dainty portions of Beef Stroganoff, or sautéed calf’s liver (see Liver).

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

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