Hazelnut

Hazelnut

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

The shiny brown shell of the hazelnut encloses a juicy, milky kernel much used in puddings, cakes and ice creams, especially in European cookery. The mealy texture of the nuts makes them perfect for use in Continental tortes (see Tortes), in which the ground nuts take the place of flour.

Hazelnuts can be eaten on their own, roasted or freshly shelled, and their texture should be crisp and brittle. They are delicious in mushroom sauce or tossed through a watercress salad, and as an extra bonus are highly nutritious, being rich in protein, fat, iron and thiamine. Hazelnuts can be purchased packaged or in the shell from most supermarkets, health food stores and good delicatessens.

To skin hazelnuts: Place kernels on a baking tray in a preheated moderate oven (180°C) for 5–6 minutes, turning once. Put the warm nuts in a paper bag or a clean cloth and rub against one another to break the skin fibres, and remove the skins from the kernels.

To roast hazelnuts: Spread skinned kernels on a baking tray and roast in a preheated hot oven (200°C) for 7–10 minutes, stirring frequently to prevent scorching.

To grind hazelnuts: Remove skins first and use a special nut grinder or a blender.

To salt hazelnuts: Skin kernels if desired. Roast as above and add 1 teaspoon salt to 140 g kernels while still warm.

See also Galette.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

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