Marjoram

Marjoram

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Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

A strongly perfumed herb, which is one of the most important of all kitchen herbs. There are three types of marjoram – sweet, pot and wild (also known as oregano) – but sweet marjoram is the one found growing in most gardens and it is the most delicate of the three.

Marjoram and thyme team exceptionally well together, and marjoram can be used in almost any dish that is flavoured with thyme. Marjoram, thyme and sage are the favourite combination for oldfashioned poultry seasoning. There are many more dishes in which marjoram is a good flavouring. It goes particularly well with veal, poultry, pork or beef; for flavouring meat loaves and sausages; in liver dishes; and in most stews. Some fish dishes such as baked fish, salmon croquettes or creamed shellfish are enhanced by the addition of marjoram.

Many vegetables are complemented by the flavour of marjoram. Try adding it to mushroom dishes, green beans and peas, potato dishes, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, eggplants (aubergines), asparagus, carrots, spinach, zucchini (courgettes) or onions.

In salads, try adding chopped marjoram to greens tossed in Vinaigrette Dressing; sliced green peppers; coleslaw; and cottage cheese and cream cheese. A little chopped fresh marjoram gives a piquancy to tomato juice, chicken noodle soup or onion soup.

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