Peanut

Peanut

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

Also known as the groundnut, because, although the flowers of this vine-like plant are borne above ground, the nuts are really edible seeds in pods which form and grow underground.

Peanuts are highly nutritious, being rich in fat and protein. Peanut oil is a light, almost tasteless oil which can be used for salads or for cooking, and is especially good for deep-frying.

In cooking the peanut may be used raw, still in its reddish skin, or roasted. Some recipes might call for roasted salted peanuts, which is the usual way peanuts are enjoyed as a snack. Sugar- and caramel-coated peanuts are also available commercially.

Peanuts are particularly important in the cooking of many Asian countries. In almost any city from Bangkok to Singapore you will find satays – five or six small cubes of meat on bamboo skewers, grilled quickly over a tiny heap of hot coals and served with a spicy-hot peanut sauce. Tins or bottles of ready-made satay sauce may be found in most Asian food shops, but it is easy to make, starting with either fresh roasted peanuts or peanut butter.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again