Persimmon

Persimmon

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

This fruit is a rare treat, because when ripe, it is very fragile and needs delicate handling. A ripe persimmon is not unlike a tomato, slightly more orange than red, and almost translucent. The season for persimmons is late autumn to early winter.

Another variety of persimmon, called sharon fruit and grown in Israel, is sometimes available. This has an edible skin, no pips and a very sweet flesh; it can be eaten while still firm unlike the ordinary persimmon, which tastes very astringent if not fully ripe and soft.

The persimmon tree originated in Japan, where it is called kaki, but it has been cultivated in Mediterranean areas for centuries. The fruit is often eaten raw but may be stewed or made into jam.

To eat persimmon: With a small sharp knife, cut around the central stalk of the persimmon and remove. Scoop out flesh with a small teaspoon. The jelly-like flesh around the seeds is edible, but the seeds are not.

Ingredients

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