Quince

Quince

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

Looking rather like an ungainly, over-size pear, the quince comes onto the market in late summer, about the same time as the early pears. Because of its tart flavour, it is not eaten raw, but makes a lovely dessert when cooked with sugar.

The quince is rich in pectin, and can be made into a beautiful, deep pink jelly. The cooked, sweetened pulp can be dried to yield a thick, jellylike paste; this is especially popular in Spain, where it is called membrillo. Quinces are best if picked before they are fully ripe, then left to mature in a warm place. The fruit is ripe when it is yellow and strongly perfumed.

The addition of a quince, peeled and grated, to the apples for a pie gives a pleasant flavour variation; quinces may also be included in a dish of cooked, spiced pears.

Ingredients

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see method for ingredients

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