Raisins

Raisins

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

Dried grapes of different varieties; they are dried in the sun or artificially, which makes their skins wrinkle, the flavour change and the sugar content increase.

Raisins make nutritious snacks eaten on their own; they are indispensable in fruit cakes, Christmas puddings and mincemeat, delicious in breads or biscuits and cakes, in a sauce to accompany some meats such as ham or in a stuffing for poultry, veal or pork. Raisins dried on the vine are superb eaten with cream cheese or fresh plain yoghurt to finish a meal.

When using raisins in a cake batter, dust them lightly with some of the flour specified in the recipe, then fold them into the batter, scattering well. The flour helps prevent them clumping together.

Raisins may be plumped if necessary, by soaking in hot water for 10 minutes or overnight in fruit juice in the refrigerator. Drain well and use according to your recipe.

Do not buy raisins in large quantities; it is best to keep a small stock on hand, stored in an airtight container – in the refrigerator or freezer. The seedless white raisins of the US are those we recognise as Sultanas.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again