Turnip and swede

Turnip and swede

Rutabaga, Neep and Swedish turnip

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

These root vegetables grow wild in parts of eastern Europe and Siberia but are widely cultivated in many other countries.

Turnip: It can be either round or long, has white flesh and is at its best when young and small. The round ones should be no bigger than tennis balls and the long ones about the size of a carrot. The green tops when very young and fresh can be prepared the same way as spinach. Buy turnips when young, and choose firm, heavy roots with no soft spots. Most turnips are peeled and cubed or sliced before cooking, with some exceptions such as the classic accompaniment to roast duckling – glazed whole baby turnips. Turnips are also delicious with ham, turkey and boiled lamb.

Swede: Also known as Swedish turnip, rutabaga in the US and neep in Scotland. Swede has a pale yellow flesh, with a firm dense texture. The flavour is slightly milder than a turnip and it can grow to a much larger size without much impairment to taste and texture. Choose swedes that are heavy with no soft spots, holes or bruising. Peel thickly and cut into dice or slices according to your recipe. They are delicious boiled then mashed with butter; roasted around a joint of lamb, beef or pork; used in soups or stews; or combined with other ingredients such as cheese or bacon.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

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