Short-rib with smoked onion and black pudding

Short-rib with smoked onion and black pudding

By
From
Marque
Serves
10
Photographer
Stuart Scott

There is no such thing as a ‘cheap cut’ anymore. There is just expensive and more expensive. Most professional kitchens still use prime or first-class cuts. I think it is partly due to laziness and partly that they feel their customers will not see value in being served lesser cuts. But the use of sous-vide preparation and cooking has revolutionised the way some restaurants use meat. We can choose a short-rib, which was previously only used for mincing or as a braising cut, and turn it into something with great flavour and texture.

Ingredients

Method

  1. Begin this recipe one day in advance. To make the brine, mix together 150 grams table salt and 3 litres water until the salt dissolves, then add 1 garlic clove, 1 bunch thyme and 1 fresh bay leaf. Soak two 1.6 kilogram short-ribs in the brine for 3 to 4 hours.
  2. Remove the short-ribs from the brine and rinse them thoroughly under running water to remove the excess brine. Pat dry. Seal the short-ribs in separate sous-vide bags with 10 black peppercorns per bag and compress with moderate pressure. Cook in a water bath at 64ºC for 12 hours.
  3. Remove the short-ribs from the water bath and chill them quickly in a blast chiller or an ice bath. Remove from the bags. Cut out the rib bones and discard. Slice the meat into neat 180 gram portions. Seal each portion in a separate sous-vide bag and compress with moderate pressure. Refrigerate until required.
  4. Finely slice 4 kilograms onions and combine in a large saucepan with 200 millilitres water and 1 teaspoon Murray River pink salt. Cover the pan with a lid and gently cook for 2 hours, or until tender. Scoop the cooked onion into a large muslin cloth, form into a ‘bag’ and suspend the bag over a bowl to drain for 2 to 3 hours, collecting the onion juices in the bowl.
  5. To make the smoked onion purée, spread two-thirds of the cooked and drained onions evenly over a baking tray and place in a cold oven. Heat a heavy-based pan over a high heat and add 200 grams hickory chips. When the smoking chips catch alight, wait until they are burning evenly then snuff out the flames by inverting a second pan over the first. Transfer the pan of hickory chips to the oven, quickly close the door and smoke the onion for 10 minutes, or until the chips stop smoking.
  6. Purée the smoked onion with 150 grams butter, some Murray River pink salt and freshly ground white pepper in a blender until smooth, then pass through a chinoise. Store in the refrigerator until required.
  7. To make the onion powder, line dehydrator trays with plastic wrap. Place the remaining one-third of the braised onions on the lined dehydrator trays and dry in a food dehydrator at 65°C for 12 hours, or until dried and crisp. Transfer to a blender and blend until pulverised to a powder. Pass through a coarse sieve and discard any large pieces. Set aside in an airtight container until required.
  8. To make the onion croquettes, bring 500 millilitres of the reserved onion juice, 100 millilitres pouring cream, 12 grams iota carrageenan and 5 grams table salt to the boil in a saucepan, then pour the mixture into spherical moulds about 1 centimetre in diameter. Allow to set in the refrigerator for about 2 hours before unmoulding.
  9. To make the black pudding, cut 1.3 kilograms brown onions into small dice, then cook in a little pork fat until tender. Once the onion is soft , add 1.3 kilograms trimmed and diced pork back fat and render it until it has melted and is glossy. Deglaze with 100 millilitres brandy and burn off the alcohol. Add 700 millilitres pouring cream, 150 grams sourdough breadcrumbs, 10 grams table salt, 1 teaspoon smoked paprika and 1 teaspoon quatre épices (see note) and bring to the boil. Cool to 40°C then add 1 litre pigs’ blood (blend together first if it has separated) and stir to combine. Pour either into natural sausage casings or into a ½ gastronorm tray lined with baking paper. Steam in a combi steam oven at 85°C for 1 hour. Allow to cool, then cut into small portions. Keep in the refrigerator until required.
  10. To make the onion rings, peel 20 pickling onions down to 2.5 centimetres in diameter. Seal in a single layer in a sous-vide bag with 300 millilitres pickling stock and compress with moderate pressure. Cook in a water bath at 85°C for 14 minutes. Remove from the water bath and chill the onions quickly in a blast chiller or an ice bath. Remove the onions from the bag, reserving the pickling liquid. Slice the onions into 4 millimetre slices and pick the slices into rings. Discard the very centre and outer layer. Keep the onion rings in a small saucepan covered with some of the reserved pickling liquid.
  11. The black pudding mousse is similar to the black pudding but has no fat and more onions. Cut 2 kilograms brown onions into fine brunoise and cook until soft . Deglaze with 100 millilitres brandy and burn off the alcohol. Add 700 millilitres pouring cream, 150 grams sourdough breadcrumbs, 10 grams table salt, 1 teaspoon smoked paprika and 1 teaspoon quatre épices and bring to the boil. Cool to 40°C then add 1 litre pigs’ blood (blend together first if it has separated) and stir to combine. Pour either into natural sausage casings or into a ½ gastronorm tray lined with baking paper. Steam in a combi steam oven at 85°C for 1 hour. Remove from the oven and chill the black pudding quickly in a blast chiller. Transfer to a Thermomix. Set the temperature to 40°C and blend on speed nine for 10 minutes to achieve a fine mousse. Keep warm until required.
  12. Reheat the short-ribs in a water bath at 57°C for 15 minutes. Remove from the bags and let the short-ribs dry slightly then sear in a hot frying pan with canola oil until evenly brown. Reheat the onion rings in some of the reserved pickling liquid, let the liquid reduce slightly and finish off with a large knob of butter and finely sliced chives.
  13. Steam the onion croquettes on a tray in a combi steam oven at 55°C for 10 minutes. Roll in the onion powder.
  14. To serve, cut a good tranche of beef per serve. Place on a hot serving plate and garnish with the onion croquettes, onion rings, smoked onion purée, a good spoonful of the black pudding mousse and a piece of black pudding.

Quatre épices

  • Blend 10 grams each of whole cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg in a spice grinder until pulverised to a powder. Mix with 10 grams ground ginger and 20 grams ground white pepper. Reserve in an airtight container until required.

    Makes 60 grams
Tags:
Marque
Mark
Best
Pei
Modern
restaurant
chef
high
end
fine
dining
challenging
complex
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