Pancakes – thin or fat

Pancakes – thin or fat

By
From
Mr & Mrs Wilkinson's How it is at Home
Makes
4
Photographer
Patricia Niven

MR: I cook pancakes for the boys on weekends – it’s our little Saturday treat and I get them to count down from five when I go to flip them in the pan. It’s fun. The difference between fat or thin pancakes here is simply whether you use self-raising flour or plain, with the self-raising giving a more American-style thick pancake and the plain a more French-style crêpe.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
150g plain (all-purpose) flour or self-raising flour
1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
1 free-range egg
185–250 ml milk (185 ml if using self-raising flour)
2 teaspoons ghee or unsalted butter

Method

  1. Mix the flour and sugar together in a bowl and make a well in the centre. Crack the egg into the well and whisk together to combine, then slowly add the milk, whisking continuously, until all the milk has been incorporated and you have a smooth, lump-free batter.

    Heat a large frying pan over a high heat. Melt ½ teaspoon of the ghee in the pan, then ladle in a quarter of the mixture. Cook for 1 minute until lightly golden, then flip the pancake over and cook for a further minute. Remove from the pan and set aside on a plate, then repeat with the remaining ghee and pancake mixture. Serve immediately with your topping of choice. (I like mine with bananas and maple syrup, Finn with jam and Jay with Promite. Yuck.)

A NOTE ON HONEY FROM MATT ...

  • Honey is the original sweetener and was used for centuries before refined sugar beet or sugarcane came along. It is essentially made up of glucose, sucrose and fructose sugars in differing ratios depending on where and what plant species the bees that produced the honey were foraging on, these differences giving it its many distinct flavours. I like to buy local honey – not least because many imports are diluted with sugar syrups to save money – and get mine from my good friends Mat and Vanessa of Rooftop Honey, who are doing amazing things for bees and honey in Melbourne’s CBD and suburbs. As honey is what the bees live off during the colder months when there is no nectar, it’s good practice to make sure that the beekeeper you buy yours from does not rob too much honey out of the hive. Personally I don’t like robust, bold-flavoured honeys, preferring the softer tones of wildflower and clover.
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