Savoury shortcrust pastry

Savoury shortcrust pastry

By
From
The Tivoli Road Baker
Makes
540 g
Photographer
Bonnie Savage and Alan Benson

Shortcrust is the workhorse of the pastry world, providing a firm base for pies, quiches and savoury tarts. Luckily, it is an easy dough to master. Nothing you can buy will ever taste like the shortcrust you make at home.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
90g water
10g white vinegar
320g plain flour
10g table salt
110g unsalted butter, cold, cut into 1 cm (½ in) dice

Method

  1. Combine the water and vinegar in a jug. Put the flour, salt and butter in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and beat the butter into the flour, mixing until you have pea-sized lumps of butter. With the mixer still running, slowly pour in the combined water and vinegar, and mix until the dough just comes together. You don’t want any dry pieces, but you need to be careful not to overwork it. You can add a bit more water if you have any dry clumps, but don’t let the dough get sticky.
  2. If you are mixing the dough by hand, combine the flour and salt in a medium sized bowl and toss through the chilled butter. Use your fingertips to rub the butter into the flour until just combined and you still have pea-sized lumps of butter visible. Tip the mixture out onto the bench. Slowly pour the combined water and vinegar over the top, using the heel of your hand to work the mixture into a dough. Push it away from your body and then gather it together with both hands. Repeat this a few times until it all comes together and no flour is visible.
  3. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least an hour before using. If it’s wrapped well, savoury shortcrust will keep for a week in the fridge, or up to three months in the freezer.

Bakery notes

  • This dough will set hard as it contains lots of butter, so take it out of the fridge at least an hour before using, so it’s easy to roll. You want the pastry to be malleable without being too soft. Having a few streaks of butter visible in the finished dough will result in a flaky texture once baked.
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