Canelé

Canelé

By
From
The Tivoli Road Baker
Makes
10
Photographer
Bonnie Savage and Alan Benson

Canelé are a traditional Bordelaise pastry that went out of fashion during times of ration but have regained popularity in the past 30–40 years. They are deceptively tricky – it’s the little things that really make the difference here.

The copper moulds used to make canelé are key, because they conduct heat so well. This is what creates the crisp exterior. Using beeswax to line the moulds is equally important, as it creates a seal and adds a gentle flavour. We use wax from Raw Honey, which really improves the end result.

We use Stroh rum, which is a spiced 80% proof rum made in Austria. Because it’s so strong you only need a little, which means the batter has a higher proportion of fat-carrying liquid such as milk. Fat equals flavour, so this rum makes a marked difference.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
450g full-cream (whole) milk
80g plain (all-purpose) flour
1/4 teaspoon table salt
200g icing (confectioners') sugar
80g eggs (approx. 2 small eggs)
30g egg yolk (approx. 2 small yolks)
1/2 vanilla bean, seeds scraped
40g butter
12g rum
100g beeswax, grated

Method

Bakery Notes

  • Make the batter two days ahead, then leave it to mature for two days (or up to seven). We have noted all the ingredients by weight, because you need absolute precision to achieve the correct balance. Don’t rush any of the steps, and if your first batch isn’t perfect, keep practising – your patience and precision will be rewarded by a truly superior canelé.

    If you can’t get beeswax you can use clarified butter (or ghee) instead. You will miss the waxy perfume, and the result will have a slightly different finish.

    If you’re buying new copper moulds, you’ll need to season them before your first batch of canelé. To do this, preheat the oven to 180°C (360°F). Grate some beeswax into a small saucepan and melt it over a very low heat. Place the moulds in the oven for 2 minutes, then remove them from the oven and pour beeswax into one until ¾ full. Using a pair of tongs, swirl the wax around to fully coat the inside of the mould, then pour the wax into the next mould, and so on, working quickly so the wax doesn’t set. Place each wax-coated mould upside down over a wire rack with kitchen paper underneath to catch any excess. Turn the moulds upright on a tray and return to the oven for 10 minutes, then leave to cool. Repeat these steps four more times to complete the seasoning process.

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