Rapadura and brazil nut cookies

Rapadura and brazil nut cookies

By
From
The Tivoli Road Baker
Makes
12 cookies
Photographer
Bonnie Savage and Alan Benson

Rapadura is unrefined whole cane sugar, widely used in Central and South America. The juice is collected from the crushed sugar cane, and set into blocks of deep, golden brown sugar. Being such a pure product, it provides a wonderfully complex, rich caramel flavour. If you can’t get hold of rapadura sugar, you can substitute soft brown sugar.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
165g butter, soft and diced
200g rapadura sugar
2 egg yolks
1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped
or 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste
215g plain (all-purpose) flour
1/2 teaspoon table salt
1/2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
150g dark chocolate, at least 60% cocoa solids, roughly chopped
100g brazil nuts, roughly chopped
sea salt, for sprinkling

Method

  1. In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, gently cream the butter and sugar together until it forms a paste. In a separate bowl, lightly whisk the yolks and vanilla, and then gradually add to the sugar and butter mixture, beating well after each addition until fully incorporated.
  2. Sift together the flour, salt and bicarbonate of soda and add to the butter mixture, gently beating until the mixture is just combined.
  3. Add the chocolate and brazil nuts and gently mix until they are evenly distributed through the dough. With wet hands, portion the dough into 12 even balls, then transfer them to a container and freeze for at least 2 hours, or overnight.
  4. The day you want to bake them, preheat the oven to 175°C (350˚F). Place the cookies onto a tray lined with baking paper, leaving plenty of space between each, as they will spread quite a lot during baking. Bake for 15–17 minutes, turning the tray if necessary, until golden. Sprinkle each cookie with sea salt and then transfer to a wire rack to cool.

Bakery notes

  • These cookies are baked from frozen at the bakery to produce that lovely crackly crust and soft centre. Baking from frozen allows the dough to hold its shape longer, spreading less at the start of baking. This creates greater contrast between the crunchy outside and the soft inside. Unfrozen cookie dough will spread more quickly, so you’ll get a flatter, crunchier cookie. Baking from frozen also means you can keep a stash in the freezer and break them out as needed.
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