Roast pumpkin with chai spice and buttermilk

Roast pumpkin with chai spice and buttermilk

By
From
Real Food by Mike
Serves
4
Photographer
Alan Benson

Leaving the seeds attached and the skin on pumpkin brings fantastic textures and nutritional benefits to any dish. The skin and seeds also allow you to bake the pumpkin that little bit longer to increase its colour and sweetness – without them the pumpkin would just cook to a pulp. I love the sharp flavour of the buttermilk, but the dressing can be made with any milk – try it with one of the nut milks.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1/2 jap pumpkin, skin on, cut into wedges, seeds left in
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, for dressing
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 pinch sea salt
1/2 bunch coriander, leaves picked
1 lime, cut into wedges

Dressing

Quantity Ingredient
125ml buttermilk
1 tablespoon sticky chai tea
125g plain yoghurt

Method

  1. For the dressing, pour the buttermilk into a saucepan and bring it to the boil. Remove the pan from the heat and add the sticky chai tea. Leave for 5 minutes to infuse, then strain the mixture into a bowl. Allow to cool for 5 minutes, then stir in the yoghurt to complete the dressing. Set aside.
  2. Preheat the oven to 220°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper.
  3. Place the pumpkin, skin side down, on the baking paper. Drizzle with the olive oil to coat, then sprinkle the cinnamon and sea salt over. Bake for 25 minutes or until the pumpkin is light brown and soft with burnt tips. Serve the pumpkin with the dressing drizzled over, a scattering of coriander leaves and the lime wedges on the side.

Note

  • Sticky chai tea, also known as wet chai, is a mixture of raw chai tea ingredients combined with honey to give it a sticky, thick texture.

Medicinal Benefit

  • Pumpkin is rich in vitamin A and beta-carotene, which are essential for good vision. The seeds are high in protein and iron, which aid in the production of haemoglobin in red blood cells. Buttermilk is a source of calcium, which builds and protects bones, and the cinnamon contains eugenol, a potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antibacterial compound.
Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again