Baked whole leather jackets, marjoram, capers and lemon

Baked whole leather jackets, marjoram, capers and lemon

By
From
Real Food by Mike
Serves
4-6
Photographer
Alan Benson

Leather jackets are among the unsung heroes of Australian fish. They are often snared as a bycatch while the fishing boats are heading back to shore from an expedition. Other fish that would work well in this recipe are flat fish like John Dory, flounder or sole, or larger fish like halibut and turbot. They will just take a little longer to cook and I would add some white wine to the tray so they are not baking dry.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1kg leather jackets, black skin removed
75g plan flour
extra-virgin olive oil for shallow frying
50g butter
2 tablespoons baby capers in vinegar, rinsed and drained well
1 bunch marjoram, leaves picked
squeeze of lemon juice, plus lemon cheeks to serve

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 250°C and line a shallow roasting tin with baking paper.
  2. Dust the fish with the flour and season with some salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  3. In a large frying pan, heat a little olive oil and fry the fish for about 4 minutes on one side only. Remove the fish from the pan and place them, cooked side up, in the roasting tin.
  4. While the pan is still hot, add the butter, capers, half the marjoram leaves and the lemon juice and sizzle for 2 minutes to form a burnt butter sauce. Pour the sauce over the top of the fish and transfer the tin to the oven for 5 minutes. Remove the tin from the oven and allow the fish to rest for 5 minutes. Scatter with the remaining marjoram leaves and serve with the lemon cheeks.

Medicinal Benefit

  • Nutritionally speaking, you shouldn’t underestimate the potency of herbs. Marjoram contains a compound called thymol, which has antifungal and other powerful healing properties. Sage contains rosmarinic acid, which is good for the memory. Parsley contains eugenol, a strong anti-inflammatory and antibacterial compound. Capers are rich in rutin, which helps thin the blood and improve circulation, and contain vitamin B3, which can help lower ‘bad’ cholesterol. Lemons are a rich source of vitamin C, one of the strongest natural antioxidants there is. Vitamin C plays a health-giving role in so many areas – it promotes collagen synthesis, helps with healing, is antiviral and anticarcinogenic and helps prevent neurodegenerative diseases. It can also help with arthritis, colds and fevers.
Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again