Blueberry, celery and pecan salad with lemon myrtle and labne

Blueberry, celery and pecan salad with lemon myrtle and labne

By
From
Real Food by Mike
Serves
4
Photographer
Alan Benson

I’m a big fan of breakfast salads. I like to eat light in the morning as I’m always quite busy and don’t want to feel lethargic while trying to digest a heavy breakfast. If you don’t have time to make labne or find it, yoghurt is a good substitute. Try to find strained yoghurt or a highquality, pot-set yoghurt with no sugar added. If you do make labne, save the whey for the Whey lemonade recipe.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 handful lemon myrtle leaves
500ml boiling water
1 young celery stalk or a thin stalk from the middle of a bunch
250g blueberries
50g activated pecans, sliced
2 teaspoons honey

Labne

Quantity Ingredient
375g pot-set yoghurt

Method

  1. To make the labne, line a strainer or fine colander with two layers of muslin (cheesecloth) and spoon in the yoghurt. Suspend the lined strainer over a large bowl in the refrigerator overnight to strain the whey. (The labne is the solids left in the muslin.)
  2. Bruise the lemon myrtle leaves by holding them in your hand and clenching your fist a few times. Place them in a teapot and pour over the boiling water. Allow to steep for 30 minutes until cooled to room temperature. Strain and discard the leaves.
  3. Shave the celery very thinly into serving bowls. Add the blueberries and pecans and mix to combine. Pour the tea into the bowls over the blueberry mix and place a nice dollop of labne on top. Drizzle with the honey and serve.

Medicinal Benefit

  • Anthocyanidins are a type of antioxidant responsible for the red, blue and purple pigmentation we see in various fruits and vegetables such as blueberries. Anticarcinogenic, they also help to maintain good heart health. Blueberries also contain a substance called chlorogenic acid, which helps slow down fat absorption and speeds up the metabolism, which is handy for weight loss. Lemon myrtle leaves are rich in an essential oil called citral; it’s antifungal, high in antioxidants and can provide an immune boost, plus help with muscle cramps and rheumatism.
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