Coconut bread with blackberry butter

Coconut bread with blackberry butter

By
From
Real Food by Mike
Serves
8
Photographer
Alan Benson

Although you can use desiccated coconut for the coconut bread, I use grated fresh coconut as it gives a chunkier finish. If you don’t have any baking powder, try combining the same amount of bicarbonate of soda with vinegar to get a fizz. The carbon dioxide reaction will be your raising agent. If you’re using this method, don’t add this at the beginning with the flour. Instead you’ll need to add it to the batter at the very last stage before it goes into your cake tin and then bake it immediately. Every second this reactive agent is in your batter it is fizzing and slowly decreasing in power, so you need to act fast or your bread will be flat.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
100g coconut flour
1/2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 eggs
6 egg whites
125ml extra-virgin olive oil
120ml maple syrup
2 tablespoons fresh coconut, grated
1 quantity blackberry butter

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 175°C. Grease and line the bottom and sides of a 21 x 11 cm loaf tin with baking paper.
  2. Sift the flour, bicarbonate of soda, baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt into a mixing bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the whole eggs and egg whites with the oil and maple syrup at low speed (or swiftly by hand) to combine, before raising the speed to whip the mixture to a fluffy texture. Add the flour mixture and beat at low speed until just combined, then fold through the grated coconut.
  4. Pour the batter into the prepared tin and smooth the surface. Bake for 1 hour or until a skewer inserted in the centre comes out clean. Leave to cool for 20 minutes in the tin, then turn the cake out and cool on a wire rack.
  5. Serve the bread fresh with lashings of blackberry butter, or toast the bread to give it a nice crisp texture – this will also enable the butter to melt.

Medicinal Benefit

  • This coconut bread is sugar- and gluten-free, helpful to those with intolerances and dietary preferences. Coconut contains a substance called lauric acid, which increases the ‘good’ cholesterol levels in the blood, beneficial in preventing plaque build-up in the arteries. Blackberries contain anthocyanidins, a specific set of compounds that give pigmentation to various fruits and vegetables. As antioxidants, they are anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic. Blackberries also contain immune-boosting vitamin C, vitamin A for good vision, vitamin E and vitamin K, the last of which helps with blood clotting.
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