Appetizers and salads

Appetizers and salads

By
Paola Gavin
Contains
16 recipes
Published by
Quadrille Publishing
ISBN
9781787130425
Photographer
Mowie Kay

‘An empty stomach – a heart without joy’ JUDEO-SPANISH PROVERB

All around the Mediterranean and the Middle East, meals begin with a variety of appetizers and salads called antipasti, mezze or kemia. These are especially important in Jewish households because of the Sabbath laws, which forbid the cooking of food on the Sabbath. North African Jews in particular have an enormous repertoire of raw and cooked salads, made with artichokes, courgettes (zucchini), fennel, peppers, tomatoes, cauliower, carrots, potatoes or broad (fava) beans, and often dressed with olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, cumin and harissa – the spicy hot sauce that is so popular throughout the Maghreb.

Across Eastern Europe and Russia, salads of beetroots (beets), potatoes or cabbage predominate – usually dressed with sour cream and herbs. In Georgia, salads of beans, beetroots (beets), mushrooms or aubergines (eggplants) oen include walnuts or pomegranate seeds, while in Iran and the Balkans, vegetable salads are often mixed with yoghurt.

Middle Eastern mezze are not only served as appetizers, but can also make up an entire meal. A typical combination might be a bowl of hummus, the parsley and bulgur salad called tabbouleh, several kinds of olives, raw vegetables such as carrot, celery or cucumber, stuff†ed vegetables and perhaps some goat’s cheese.

Featured Recipes in this Chapter

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