Main courses

Main courses

By
Paola Gavin
Contains
20 recipes
Published by
Quadrille Publishing
ISBN
9781787130425
Photographer
Mowie Kay

‘He who eats slowly, lengthens the days of his life’ JUDEO–SPANISH PROVERB

There are an enormous number of vegetarian dishes in the Jewish kitchen, primarily because of the strict dietary laws that forbid the combining of milk and meat products.

Every Jewish community has a variety of savoury pastries in their culinary repertoire – from Sephardic pastels, bulemas, filas and tapadas, Central European strudels and Middle Eastern sambusaks to the Russian piroshki. These pastries are traditionally served for festivals, weddings, bar mitzvahs and other special occasions, as well as for desayanu – breakfast on the Sabbath.

The Sephardic Jews of Greece and Turkey are particularly noted for their great love of vegetable dishes – especially gratins (called almodrotes, antchusas and esfongos) and croquettes (albondigas, fritikas and keftes). Syrian Jews make a variety of delicious vegetarian dishes, including vegetables baked with eggs and cheese (b’jibn), as well as stu­ffed vegetables (mahshi) dressed with exotic sauces ‚flavoured with tamarind or pomegranate syrup.

Ashkenazi Jews, on the other hand, have a more modest vegetarian repertoire, due to the cooler climate of Northern and Eastern Europe, which limits the availability of seasonal vegetables. Nevertheless, they are great lovers of cabbage, carrots and potatoes – which they use to make a variety of kugels (puddings) and pancakes.

Featured Recipes in this Chapter

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