Soups

Soups

By
Paola Gavin
Contains
17 recipes
Published by
Quadrille Publishing
ISBN
9781787130425
Photographer
Mowie Kay

‘Worries go down better with soup.’ YIDDISH SAYING

Soups have always been important in the Jewish kitchen. In medieval France and Germany, soups were usually served at every meal, and in poorer households a meal would often consist simply of soup with bread – in fact, the word ‘soup’ derives from the German sup, which originally referred to a piece of bread soaked in liquid.

Soup also plays an essential part in many Jewish holidays and festivals. Russian borsch, Lithuanian krupnik or Italian minestrone del Sabato were traditionally served for Friday night dinner. Soups are often simmered slowly overnight and served for lunch on the Sabbath. Moroccan Jews like to prepare harira, a soup rich in pulses, for Yom Kippur, while Algerian Jews serve a vegetable and vermicelli soup called boketof to break the fast of Tisha Be-Av.

Jewish soups generally fall into four categories: cold soups, such as the chilled fruit soups of Central and Eastern Europe; simple soups or broths made with water or stock that often include dumplings; pureed soups, usually enriched with sour cream or yoghurt; and substantial soups made with grains and pulses that are meals in themselves.

Featured Recipes in this Chapter

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