Sorbet

Sorbet

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From
PS Desserts
Photographer
Mark Roper

Sorbets are my pride and joy. When I first started making sorbet, I used the sugar syrup/Baume measurement method to varying degrees of success. Over the years, I have developed this chart. Using the quantities given in the chart, and following my method, will result in perfect sorbet every time. The chart is all about balance, so that the fruit shines through without being too sweet or too icy.



Strawberry / caster sugar (per 1 kg fruit) = 225 g / powdered glucose = 75 g / water = nil

Rockmelon / caster sugar = 250 g / powdered glucose = 70 g / water = 100 ml

Honeydew melon / caster sugar = 250 g / powdered glucose = 70 g / water = 50 ml

Watermelon / caster sugar = 240 g / powdered glucose = 70 g / water = nil

Apricot / caster sugar = 300 g / powdered glucose = 85 g / water = 285 ml

Peach / caster sugar = 260 g / powdered glucose = 75 g / water = 95 ml

Pear / caster sugar = 300 g / powdered glucose = 60 g / water = 300 ml

Lemon or lime / caster sugar = 600 g / powdered glucose = 360 g / water = 1360 ml

Orange / caster sugar = 225 g / powdered glucose = 35 g / water = nil

Mandarin / caster sugar = 225 g / powdered glucose = 45 g / water = nil

Grapefruit / caster sugar = 225 g / powdered glucose = 65 g / water = nil

Raspberry / caster sugar = 260 g / powdered glucose = 50 g / water = 120 ml

Blackberry / caster sugar = 250 g / powdered glucose = 50 g / water = 120 ml

Mango / caster sugar = 360 g / powdered glucose = 100 g / water = 540 ml

Passionfruit / caster sugar = 360 g / powdered glucose = 170 g / water = 470 ml

Pineapple / caster sugar = 300 g / powdered glucose = 80 g / water = 280 ml

Strawberry / rockmelon / honeydew melon / watermelon sorbet

Ingredients

Method

  1. Weigh hulled strawberries or peeled chunks of melon to yield 1 kg.
  2. Purée the fruit, in this case strawberries, with the sugar, glucose (and water if applicable) in a blender until a smooth purée forms.
  3. Strain the purée through a sieve, using a spoon to push the mixture through.
  4. Churn in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions, then freeze for 1–2 hours or until firm.

Apricot / peach / pear sorbet

Ingredients

Method

  1. Peaches and pears need to be peeled, but not apricots. Halve the fruit and remove the stones or cores, then weigh the prepped fruit to yield 1 kg.
  2. Combine the fruit, in this case apricots, with the sugar, glucose and water in a heavybased saucepan and simmer until the fruit is tender (see note).
  3. Purée the fruit in a blender until smooth. Strain the purée through a sieve, using a spoon to push the mixture through. Allow to cool.
  4. Churn in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions, then freeze for 1–2 hours or until firm.

Citrus / raspberry / blackberry / mango / passionfruit / pineapple sorbet

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

  1. If using berries (see note), mangoes passionfruit or pineapples, purée in a blender first. Weigh the purée or juice to yield 1 kg.
  2. Combine half of the purée or juice, in this case blackberry purée, with the sugar, glucose (and water if applicable) in a heavy-based saucepan. Bring to the boil, stirring regularly with a whisk to ensure the sugar has dissolved.
  3. Cool, then add to the remaining purée or juice.
  4. Churn in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions, then freeze for 1–2 hours or until firm.

Note

  • Some fruits benefit from cooking and some definitely do not. Melons, for example, will taste soapy if heated and strawberries will taste jammy when cooked. On the other hand, pears and apricots need to be cooked to enhance their flavour and to prevent the fruit from discoloring and tasting pulpy or watery. Of course, the results are dependent on the quality of the fruit. Sub-standard fruit makes sub-standard sorbet.

Note

  • You can add flavourings, such as a split and scraped vanilla bean, at this stage to the sorbet — just make sure you remove it before you purée the mixture.

Note

  • If making a raspberry or blackberry sorbet, frozen berries work very well.

Note

  • Trimoline is a supersaturated sugar syrup (an invert sugar). You can buy it online or at specialty food suppliers. Liquid glucose is readily available from supermarkets and is an okay substitute for trimoline.
Tags:
PS
Desserts
Philippa
Phillipa
Sibley
sweet
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