Missie roti

Missie roti

By
From
Spice Kitchen
Makes
6-8
Photographer
Jana Liebenstein

In North India, many kinds of flour are used to make breads. This is a part of India where hardly any rice is eaten at all. Atta (from durum wheat), corn, besan (chickpea flour), millet, rye, ragi (from finger millet) and other flours all produce hearty, peasant-style breads. Missie roti is a rustic, home-style spicy flat bread, low in carbohydrates, that highlights the nutty flavour of besan. Serve with plain yoghurt for a quick snack, breakfast or brunch dish.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
150g atta flour or plain flour, (see note)
55g besan
1/2 teaspoon chilli flakes
pinch asafoetida
1/2-1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1 tablespoon dried fenugreek leaves
Ghee
or plain yoghurt, to serve

Method

  1. Put the atta or plain flour, besan, chilli, asafoetida and salt in a large bowl. Crush the fenugreek leaves between your hands and add to the bowl, then mix together. Gradually pour in 190 ml water while working the ingredients together, adding a little more water if necessary to make a flexible dough that does not stick to the sides of the bowl. Turn out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead for 10 minutes, or until pliable but not sticky. Place the dough in a clean bowl, cover with a damp cloth and rest for 30 minutes.
  2. Divide the dough into 6–8 balls, each about the size of a golf ball. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out each piece of dough until it is thin like a tortilla and about 6–8 cm in diameter. (This dough is not elastic, and so the roti may be irregular or slightly cracked, which suits this rustic, strongly flavoured bread.)
  3. Heat a heavy-based frying pan over a medium heat. Dry-cook each roti for about 1 minute, then turn and cook the other side for a further 1 minute. The bread is done when it lightens in colour and little brown flecks appear on the surface. Spread each roti with a little ghee before serving, or serve
  4. Spread each roti with a little ghee before serving, or serve with yoghurt on the side.

Note:

  • You can use plain flour instead of atta flour, but the rotis will have a slightly different taste and texture.
Tags:
restaurant
Indian
India
Asia
Asian
Spice Kitchen
Ragini
Dey
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