Kum kum tamatar

Kum kum tamatar

By
From
Spice Kitchen
Serves
4
Photographer
Jana Liebenstein

With over 60 per cent of the population classified as vegetarian in India, there is no end of exciting vegetarian recipes that are special dishes in themselves, and not just a substitute for meat. An innovative and delicious recipe for special occasions, kum kum tamatar is a unique dish, and very popular at the Spice Kitchen. One of our guests even cooks it in his wood-fired oven and swears by the resulting smoky flavours of the eggplant and tomato combination. You can serve this dish on its own with Naan or Pooris, or as part of an Indian feast.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 eggplant
4 large vine-ripened or ripe tomatoes
1 tablespoon mustard oil
1 tablespoon onion, finely chopped
1 teaspoon Ginger paste
1 teaspoon Garlic paste
1 tablespoon green chilli, finely chopped
1 tablespoon coriander leaves, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/2-1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
coriander leaves, to garnish

Rogini Sauce

Quantity Ingredient
60g Ghee
or 60ml vegetable or canola oil
1/2 teaspoon Ginger paste
1/2 teaspoon Garlic paste
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon chilli powder
40g raw cashew nuts
1 onion, sliced
190ml thick cream
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1/4 teaspoon Saffron infusion
3-4 drops kewra essence, (see note)
1/2-1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
Naan, (optional)
or Pooris, (optional)

Method

  1. To make the rogini sauce, heat the ghee or oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. Sauté the ginger and garlic pastes for about 30 seconds. Add the ground coriander, turmeric, chilli powder, cashew nuts, onion, cream and tomato paste with 250 ml water. Stir to combine and heat through, then reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for 20 minutes. Allow the mixture to cool a little, then purée in a food processor.
  2. Meanwhile, roast the eggplant in a heavy-based frying pan or chargrill pan over a medium heat, or under the grill, for about 20 minutes, or until soft and the skin is charred. Turn the eggplant only once or twice during cooking. Leave until it is cool enough to handle, then cut the eggplant in half. Scoop out the flesh with a spoon, chop roughly and set aside. Discard the skin.
  3. Cut the tops off the tomatoes and discard. Scoop out the juice and flesh with a spoon, leaving just the hollowed-out shells of the tomatoes. Reserve the flesh and the shells separately.
  4. Heat the mustard oil in a separate frying pan over a medium heat. Sauté the onion, stirring occasionally, for about 3 minutes, or until golden brown. Add the ginger and garlic pastes and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the chilli, chopped coriander, turmeric, reserved eggplant and tomato flesh and salt. Stir to mix well, then cover and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat.
  5. Using a spoon, fill the hollowed-out tomatoes with the tomato and eggplant mixture, pressing it in firmly.
  6. Return the puréed rogini sauce to the frying pan and heat through over a low heat. Add the saffron infusion, kewra essence and salt and stir through.
  7. Carefully put the stuffed tomatoes in the sauce and simmer gently over a low heat for about 20 minutes, until they are soft.
  8. Garnish with coriander leaves and serve hot.

Note:

  • Kewra essence is extracted from the keora flower and is used to flavour rich Mughal curries and rice dishes. The essence is concentrated and should be used sparingly. You can purchase it in Asian and Indian grocery stores.
Tags:
restaurant
Indian
India
Asia
Asian
Spice Kitchen
Ragini
Dey
restaurant
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