Fresh cheese

Fresh cheese

Queijo fresco

By
From
Lisbon
Serves
× 200 g cheeses
Photographer
Steven Joyce

Soft, white queijo fresco often appears at the beginning of Portuguese meals, with crusty bread or crackers, and sometimes with a hot pepper paste called pimenta moida (for a recipe). Almost always eaten the day it’s made, queijo fresco is so delicate that it usually comes served in its little plastic mould, the creamy curds spilling out of the top. I love using it in starters with nuts, figs or peaches and smoked ham, or anywhere you might use ricotta or mozzarella, as well as in puddings.

The easiest way to make this cheese is using a digital instant-read food thermometer, as you stand less risk of overheating the milk. Make sure all your utensils are scrupulously clean before starting.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
2 litres whole milk
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon rennet
pimenta moida, to serve (optional)

Method

  1. Place the milk in a large, clean pan and heat it slowly until it reaches 38ºC. Remove from the heat straight away, add the salt and rennet and stir, then leave to sit for 20 minutes or so, until it begins to set into curds like thick yoghurt.
  2. Line a colander with the piece of scalded cheesecloth or muslin and use the slotted spoon to lift the curds out, leaving behind any liquid whey in the pan. Leave to drain in the colander over the sink or a bowl for 30 minutes or so, then transfer, again using a large slotted spoon, to the cheese moulds. It is tempting to squeeze out as much liquid as possible, but this cheese is served while still quite squidgy and wobbly, so leave it fairly wet and loose. Set the moulds over a bowl so they can drain a little more and place in the fridge for 1–2 hours.
  3. Eat straight away (it doesn’t keep well) with fresh bread and pimenta moida, or use in a dessert, with honey and toasted almonds, as on page 194.

you will need

  • a pan thermometer, cheesecloth or muslin (scalded with boiling water before use), a slotted spoon, 2 cheese moulds (you can also use mini spring-form cake tins, or improvise by punching holes in the base of two used, clean tins of beans)
Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again