Light-emitting diode

Light-emitting diode

By
From
The Sunday Night Book
Photographer
Patricia Niven

This variant of a whiskey sour almost glows in the dark, perhaps due to the opalescent Pernod and the silky frothed egg white. It will relieve any excesses of dinner and have you jumping around in no time. At any rate, it’s more invigorating than licking an AA battery. A perfect partner to the Squash and truffle brandade.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 part rye whiskey or bourbon
1/3 part simple syrup, ideally infused with orange or grapefruit zest
1/3 part lemon juice
dash of pernod – or pastis or ouzo
2 teaspoons egg white
ice cubes
frond fennel or dill

Method

  1. Combine the whiskey, syrup, lemon juice, Pernod and egg white in a shaker, or a jar with a lid and add plenty of ice.
  2. Shake vigorously until well chilled and the egg white is foaming.
  3. Strain into a cocktail glass, ideally a stemmed one, using a mesh strainer or sieve – you may wish to spoon some of the egg-white foam from the shaker onto your drink if too much gets left behind.
  4. Delicately garnish with a frond of fennel or dill – a little bit of green foliage sitting atop the frothy head of this drink is most appealing.
  5. Sip and perform a backwards somersault.

Simple syrup

  • As a general rule our syrups are made without any cooking. We find this produces a fresher and more delicate flavour, and provided you have enough time to let the mixture infuse, it’s actually simpler to make.

    Zest your fruit of choice into a bowl. The cocktails here call for orange or grapefruit, but in theory any fruit, herb or edible flower will make a tasty drink.

    Chop and juice the ‘zested’ fruit (if you’re making a herb or flower syrup, you’ll need to use water in place of citrus juice – add enough to cover your ingredients). Add to the bowl, along with enough sugar to give a syrupy consistency, roughly a 1:1 ratio, stirring until the sugar has completely dissolved – this can take a bit of time. If you’ve added too much sugar by accident and your syrup has become stiff, mix in enough water to loosen it up.

    Leave the mixture to infuse in a refrigerator – 24 hours is best.

    Taste it – a syrup should by nature be sweet, as when used in a cocktail it will be combined with citrus juice and alcohol; however, a little lemon juice added at this stage can help to ‘brighten’ the flavour of your chosen ingredients.

    Strain through a sieve and bottle, then store in the refrigerator.
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