Safety first

Safety first

By
Sabrina Parrini
Contains
0 recipes
Published by
Hardie Grant Books
ISBN
9781740667432
Photographer
Jacqui Melville

Although cooking is great fun, it is important to remember that some things in the kitchen can be dangerous if you are not careful. For this reason it is very important to have an adult stay in the kitchen with you the whole time you are cooking.

Knives and sharp equipment

Knives, peelers, graters and food processors are sharp, so when they are called for in a recipe, I recommend that a grown-up should always be close by to help. Very small children may not be experienced or big enough to use knives safely, in which case an adult should do what is required themselves.

Sharp knives are safer than blunt knives because you don’t need to use as much pressure to cut with them. When you use less pressure, you are less likely to slip and cut yourself.

Don’t put a knife – or anything sharp – into a sink of water for washing where it can’t be seen. If someone doesn’t know it is there, they might cut themselves.

Ovens and stovetop

Ovens and stovetops get very hot so I recommend that a grown-up should always be present when they are in use. Ask a grown-up to help you turn the heat on and off and to adjust the temperature to the correct level.

When using the oven, remember to arrange the shelves in the right place BEFORE you turn it on. In general the middle shelf is the best spot for cooking because it allows the hot air to move all around your dish and cook the food evenly.

Stand back when the oven door is being opened as the hot steam can burn. Both grown-ups and children should use oven mitts when moving things in and out of the oven. Ideally they should be long enough to cover your forearms – and please make sure they are the right size for your hands: small mitts for small hands.

When cooking on the stovetop, always ask a grown-up to turn the heat on and to adjust it to the correct temperature. Either you or an adult MUST hold the handle steady when stirring something in a pan on the stovetop. Always wear oven mitts when working near a stovetop or with hot ingredients.

Turn the handles of pots and pans so they face to the back or side of the stove. Handles poking out could cause an accident if someone accidentally knocks them. Never leave them unattended and always remember to turn the heat off when you are finished.

Always use a timer, so you don’t overcook or burn anything; it’s easy to forget how long something has been cooking! Never leave the kitchen when you have something on the stovetop as it may burn or catch on fire.

Spills

Always clean up spills straight away. Spills on the floor make it slippery and you might slip and fall over. Wipe up with paper towels and once you’ve cleaned up, tell everyone else to be careful of the wet floor.

Allergies

If you don’t already know, check with your parents or a grown-up to find out if you are allergic to any foods. If you are, ALWAYS tell the adult you are cooking with before you start. They might not know or they might have forgotten. Make sure you both check the recipe carefully to make sure it doesn’t use any ingredients you can’t have. If you are unsure about something, it’s safer to choose another recipe instead.

Food safety

It's important to follow some simple hygiene rules when cooking so that no one gets sick! If you are cooking with both raw meats and vegetables, make sure you use two separate chopping boards and never use the same knife to chop vegetables after you've cut up meat. This is because raw meats sometimes have bacteria in them (that are killed by the cooking process) which you don't want to end up on your veggies!

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