Rye bread

Rye bread

By
From
Spring
Makes
1 loaf
Photographer
Andy Sewell

I first paid a visit to Shipton Mill a couple of years ago, to learn more about the flours we were using in our breads. John, Shipton’s owner, and his team, taught us a lot about flours and bread making and in return we gave them cooking tips. Our collaboration culminated in a Harvest Festival that we cooked together in the autumn of 2013. This seeded rye is based on a recipe given to us by Clive, head baker at Shipton Mill. Wonderfully sticky and laden with seeds, it has a closed crumb and good crust. It’s so good that I usually double up the quantities at home and make two loaves.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
10g sesame seeds
30g poppy seeds
30g linseeds
30g pumpkin seeds
30g sunflower seeds
300g light rye flour, (at 25–28°C), plus extra to dust
300g To make a starter
9g salt
140ml warm water, (at 25–28°C)
rice flour, to dust
coarse semolina, to dust (optional)

Method

  1. Put all the seeds in a bowl, pour on enough water (at room temperature) to cover and leave to soak overnight.
  2. The following day, check the temperature of your ingredients with a thermometer: ­25–28°C is the optimum level of warmth for your yeast to grow. Place the flour, starter and salt in a bowl. Drain off any excess water from the soaked seeds, then add them to the flour mixture. Add the water and mix well with your hands to form a smooth dough. Leave to rest for 30 minutes.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead lightly, then cover loosely and leave to rise for 1 hour.
  4. Flour a proving basket very generously with a mixture of rye flour and rice flour. Place the dough in the basket and cover loosely with a floured cloth. Leave to prove in a warm, draught-free place for 1½ hours.
  5. Preheat your oven to 220°C. When the oven is really hot, generously flour a flat baking tray with course semolina or rice flour (this will stop the bread from sticking) and place the tray in the oven to heat up. Once the tray is hot, invert your risen dough onto it and bake in the oven for 40 minutes.
  6. This bread tastes even better the day after it is made and will keep well for 3–4 days; the flavour matures as the bread ages.
Tags:
Skye Gyngell
seasonal
Spring
London
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