Provolone

Provolone

By
From
Modern Italian Food
Photographer
Earl Carter

This cheese can be mild or ‘piccante’ (sharp) and is typical of Southern Italy, although these days masses of it are produced in the north of Italy. Besides being good to eat, when of good reputable quality, it can liven up some soups, frittata, tarts and various stuffings.

Provolone, Provole, Caciocavallo and Scamorza are all mature stretched-curd cheeses. Hot whey and water are used to scald the curds in order to firm them and prevent further acid development. The water added is at 90–95°C. This makes the curds melt and consolidate into a thick, fibrous, pliable mass. The warm curd mass is kneaded until it is smooth and shiny, then cut into long pieces and pulled into long threads.

By comparison with mozzarella, these harder stretched cheese types are worked more intensively to expel moisture. They come in many shapes, from giant sausages, to cones, to bells and pear shapes. As they age they can become more ‘piccante’.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

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