Rhubarb and pork tagine

Rhubarb and pork tagine

By
From
The Natural Cook
Serves
4
Photographer
Laura Edwards

Sour rhubarb goes really well with sweet pork and is nice slowly cooked in a tagine. The rich sauce works well with a side of steamed bulgur wheat or couscous.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 quantity Stewed rhubarb with sultanas, rum and dark sugar
400g pork shoulder, chopped into chunks
good glug light olive oil
3 onions, sliced
4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 teaspoons ground coriander
200ml white wine
2 turnips, cut into wedges, or potatoes
6 sprigs coriander, stalks finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped

Method

  1. Find a large saucepan that has a lid. Sear the pork in the light olive oil in small batches, allowing it to brown and caramelise on each side. Take your time with this, as it will give the tagine plenty of extra flavour. If you crowd the pan it will lose temperature and stew the meat, making it difficult to caramelise the edges and sweeten the flavour. Remove the pork from the pan with a slotted spoon, leaving the fat, then repeat to cook the rest of the meat.
  2. Cook the onions slowly in the pork fat left in the pan, with the garlic and ground coriander, for 10 minutes, until really soft. Add the wine and bring to the boil, scraping all the sticky bits from the base of the pan.
  3. Return the pork to the saucepan with the rhubarb and turnips or potatoes. Pop the lid on and reduce the heat to its lowest. Cook for one and a half hours, until the pork is tender. Taste and adjust the seasoning, then serve strewn with the coriander leaves.

Storage

  • Tagines, like stews, get better with age. Consider cooking the tagine the day before you want it, for a mellower flavour. It will keep for four days in a sealed container in the fridge. Reheat it gently on the hob until hot right through.

Cook natural

  • Herb stalks taste delicious and should be eaten whenever possible. They are more flavourful than the leaves, but tougher, so they need to be finely chopped. If you have any particularly tough stalks, you can save them to add to stocks instead.
Tags:
The Natural Cook
Poco
Tom Hunt
sustainability
food cycle
vegetables
seasonal
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