Rib-eye steak with shallot and parsley marmalade

Rib-eye steak with shallot and parsley marmalade

By
From
Kitchin Suppers
Serves
4
Photographer
Laura Edwards

Friends tell me they enjoy cooking a steak for supper, but can’t seem to make a good sauce to go with it. In truth, it’s almost impossible to match the depth of flavour achieved by the lengthy reduction of sauces in a restaurant kitchen. So, I experimented at home and came up with this shallot and parsley topping. I think it’s delicious and works as well as any sauce. And I love the fact that the entire meal can be on the table within 30 minutes of coming home, if you have the ingredients to hand.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
4 rib-eye steaks, about 250g each
olive oil, for cooking
12 shallots, peeled and sliced
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
250ml white wine
1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
1 tablespoon grain mustard
2 tablespoons parsley, chopped

Method

  1. Remove the steaks from the fridge, ideally 20 minutes before you need to cook them, to bring to room temperature.
  2. Heat a heavy-based saucepan and add a drizzle of olive oil. Add the shallots, season with salt and pepper and sweat gently for 4–5 minutes. Pour in half the white wine and reduce right down until dry, then repeat with the rest of the wine. Remove from the heat and set aside until ready to use.
  3. Meanwhile, heat a heavy-based, non-stick frying pan over a high heat. Season the steaks well with salt and the cracked pepper. When the pan is very hot, add a little drizzle of olive oil, then the steaks. Colour them quickly, for 4–5 minutes on each side, depending on how rare you like your meat, lowering the heat to medium after a couple of minutes on each side.
  4. Remove the steaks from the pan to a warmed platter and set aside to rest in a warm place for 5 minutes before serving.
  5. While the steaks are resting, return the frying pan to a medium heat and add the cooked shallots, mustard and chopped parsley. Cook for 1–2 minutes and serve on top or alongside the steaks.

Note

  • Knowing when a steak is cooked just by pressing it comes naturally after so many years, but if you are unsure, the thumb trick is a great indicator. Open the palm of your right hand and relax the hand. Take the left hand and push the skin area by the base of the right thumb to see how raw meet feels. Now press your right thumb and little fingertip together and you’ll feel that skin area harden: this feels like well done meat. To simulate the feel of medium, press the thumb and ring fingertip together. For rare, press the thumb and index finger together; the skin area should give quite a bit and be a lot softer. Now press your steak to check that it is cooked to your liking.
Tags:
The Kitchin Restaurant
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