Creamed cakes

Creamed cakes

By
Leiths School of Food and Wine
Contains
17 recipes
Published by
Quadrille Publishing
ISBN
978 184949 549 3
Photographer
Peter Cassidy

The classic creamed cake is a Victoria sandwich. All manner of flavours and ingredients can be added to this basic mixture to create an endless variety of cakes. Once mastered, the classic sponge leads to more advanced recipes, and the opportunity for creativity.

To make the perfect creamed cake, make sure that the ingredients are at room temperature, the tin is prepared and the oven is heating before you begin to make the mixture. There are three main areas to concentrate on: creaming the butter and sugar until really pale, light and fluffy, beating well between each egg addition, and folding in the flour as carefully and gently as possible, to avoid losing the precious air that has been incorporated.

The cake rises because of the raising agent in the self-raising flour, the air incorporated during the creaming of the butter and sugar, from sifting the flour and beating in the eggs, and also because of the steam created in the oven heat from water in the eggs.

Covering a fruit cake with marzipan

Lightly dust a clean surface with icing sugar and roll out the marzipan to a circle, about 20cm in diameter, ensuring the marzipan is moving on the surface and not stuck, and there are as few cracks as possible around the edge. If the cake is not level, shave a little off the top.

If the cake is still slightly domed, shape a little marzipan into a thin rope. Secure this around the edge of the cake with a little apricot glaze (to ensure the cake is flat, when turned upside down). Turn the cake upside down and lightly brush the surface (originally the base) and sides with 2–3 tbsp apricot glaze.

Place the cake, glazed surface down, in the centre of the marzipan circle and, using your hands, carefully bring the marzipan up against the sides of the cake. Now carefully turn the cake over.

Roll lightly across the top of the cake and coax the marzipan down the sides with your hands to the bottom. Roll a jam jar or tin around the sides of the cake, to neaten and smooth the marzipan, ensuring the sides are straight and edges square. Trim to neaten, if necessary. Place on a suitably sized cake board and leave uncovered for about 3 days for the marzipan to dry out. This prevents the almond oils from staining the icing.

To make an apricot glaze...

Put 250g apricot jam (not whole fruit) into a small saucepan with a finely pared strip or two of lemon zest and heat gently, without stirring, until the jam has melted, without letting it boil. If the jam is very thick add 2–3 tbsp warm water to loosen it, then pass through a fine sieve into a bowl, discarding the zest.

Covering a fruit cake with ready-made fondant

For an easy way to ice a celebration cake, you can buy ready-made fondant icing or sugar paste, in a block or ready-rolled form. It gives a good finish, but doesn’t have the same flavour as traditional royal icing. The marzipan-covered cake must be allowed to dry thoroughly for 3 days before fondant icing is applied.

On a work surface lightly dusted with icing sugar, roll out the fondant icing to a thickness of about 3–4mm. Carefully lift the icing onto a rolling pin and lay it over the cake.

Smooth the fondant icing over the top surface of the cake and then down the sides, making sure you don’t create any pleats or folds.

Trim off the excess icing with a knife and neaten the bottom edge against the cake board, tucking the end towards the cake if necessary.

Featured Recipes in this Chapter

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