Easy-as bacon

Easy-as bacon

Green bacon

By
From
A Year of Practiculture
Makes
2-3 kg
Photographer
Rohan Anderson & Kate Berry

Who doesn’t love bacon? Well, as amazing as it may seem, there are actually a lot of non-bacon-lovers out there – studies show that four out of five people love bacon (study consisted of five of my mates). Whether it’s cooked over the morning campfire or in the kitchen at home, the smell of frying bacon gets me going. I used to buy the dodgy stuff from the supermarket, then my inquisitive mind totally ruined that when I researched the conditions of factory-farmed pigs, so I had a spell without bacon. It didn’t last long. I had to find a way to get back on the porky bandwagon, so I decided to start making my own. Having an entire pig’s carcass in your freezer is also good motivation to make bacon.

The pig butchered this year was massive, weighing in at well over 120 kilograms! Not ideal for standard butchery cuts, the oversized sow was better suited to making salami. But I wasn’t to be put off: I had bacon brain and nothing was going to stand in my way. Seriously, it didn’t take much research to find out how easy it is to make bacon at home. And there are so many variations, which tells me there’s plenty of room for mistakes. Let’s keep everyone happy here and remind the reader about the importance of hygiene and safety when curing any meat. This recipe is but one approach to curing bacon. There are plenty more ways to do it, but this is what works for me.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
2-3 kg side pork loin
260g salt
100-200g brown sugar

Method

  1. Keep the skin on the loin but trim off any loose bits.
  2. Mix the salt and sugar in a bowl and then rub the mixture all over the meat, ensuring an even spread.
  3. Place the loin in an airtight plastic container and refrigerate for 7–9 days. Each day, flip the bacon over so the liquid drains from the meat.
  4. Once the meat has hardened (because the salt has drawn out the moisture) wash the salt and sugar off. (I then slice off the skin because it’s annoyingly hard to cut through without an electric slicer.)
  5. Slice some up and fry it! I love it with an egg and sliced chilli.
Tags:
rohan
anderson
practiculture
whole
larder
love
sustainable
sustainability
grow
harvest
forage
hunt
seasonal
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